All posts filed under: Epic Road Trips

A collection of posts about extended road trips that cover more territory than a day trip. For more tales from the road, see the “Road Trips” section.

We will have pictures!

Remember the time I said 2013 may be the year I start posting more regularly? That was a good idea. Too bad I’m failing miserably at it so far. I mean, I’ve been working — a lot — and keeping busy with life projects in general. Life projects including working on that Montana respite that I take off for in approximately 23 days, 8 hours and 11 minutes. I think everyone Lacey follows on Instagram has been in Montana this summer and every time I get on Twitter there are about 500 tweets of pictures from Two-Medicine Lake, some mountain or other or something else breath-takingly beautiful that I just can’t wait to see. But the best part of this trip: Barring some unforeseen disaster, I will actually have pictures — and good ones at that. Lets recount some of my camera misadventures, shall we? Flash back to 2010. I have recently purchased my first DSLR, a Nikon D5000. Its something of a reward to myself for just being me. So, I’m in the Scripps …

Maine!

Portland Head Light, most photographed lighthouse in Maine. As lame as it sounds, I’ve always wanted to go to Maine. It’s not a metropolitan place, its more of a wilderness and that’s just the kind of thing that suits me. I’m happy with a little ocean, a little rocky beach, a few lighthouses and the chance to spot a moose – as long as I’m safely in a car or somewhere the moose can’t get me. Sunday morning around 8 a.m., I finally got to see Maine. The only bad part of the trip is that we only had time to venture in to see one lighthouse, grab a lobster roll and start bookin’ it back to DC. We were in a race to get back before the Metro stopped running. After getting some tips from the best welcome center worker ever, we plotted a trip to go up to see the most photographed lighthouse and then stop to walk along some cliffs and see another lighthouse on our way back out of the state. …

50 in 30

There are two kinds of perks with this internship: work and non-work. These are very technical titles, so pay close attention to the following descriptions. Work perks are the kind of everyday perks one experiences as a reporter in Washington D.C. These are things like being able to go to the White House. Non-work perks are just about everything else. These include just living in DC and the general proximity to other eastern states. I want to see all 50 states before I turn 30 on July 14, 2015. At the start of this internship I had about four years and 20 states to go. After the East Coast Extravaganza two weekends ago, the magic number is down to 13. The first leg of our trip took though four states I had already seen before. We started in Virginia, where we picked up our rental car, passing through Maryland and Delaware to get to Philadelphia. I wasn’t particularly thrilled to go through Delaware again, but we passed through Wilmington and realized that there is a …

Road Trip: East Coast Extravaganza

Danielle and I are taking to the road again, this time with two more interns, Raymundo and Adam. As soon as the first train leaves Woodley Park, we’re headed up the East Coast to Maine. Although this trip won’t have the epic proportions of the Gypsy Trip, it does have some notable statistics nonetheless. We’ll be covering about 1,500 miles in two days. Its about a 10 hour drive to Maine from the District, but with side trips we’ll be in transit about 12 hours each day. But my most favorite statistic: We’ll be covering 12 states in 48 hours. We’ll see Virginia, Maryland, Deleware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Maine and Vermont. I’ll be adding a whopping seven more states to my count!  We’ve talked about making a video with stories written by each of us to put out on the wire. And we’ve discussed a mockumentary that would have nothing to do with the Foundation’s wire. I’m not sure what we’ll end up with, but rest assured …

The Journey of a Lifetime

There isn’t much to say about our last couple of days on the trip. After we left Yellowstone, we stayed in Deadwood, South Dakota in the nicest cabin of our entire trip. The next morning, we saw Mount Rushmore, and drove into Minnesota to sleep before leaving early this morning to come home.  Everything kind of ended slowly, with all of us sorry to see the trip end, but looking forward to sleeping in our own beds, with our own showers and real food. Not something from a gas station microwave or out of the cooler. We traveled a staggering 7,500 miles on this trip. We covered 17 states in 13 days and 12 nights. We visited two UNESCO World Heritage sites, eight national parks and monuments and as much Pacific ocean as we could squeeze in. We camped in the tent four nights, stayed in cabins three nights and bunked with my aunt and uncle one night. We stayed in hotels in Hannibal, Mo., Manhattan Beach, Calif., San Francisco and Las Vegas. The Paris …

This is what happens when you spend two days in a car

Despite how it ended, today was absolutely amazing! I’m having trouble with deciding if I should start at the beginning of the day or the end. Hmmmm. Well, I guess I could start by saying that I’m currently sitting in a cabin — excuse me, kabin — at a KOA near Colorado Springs. And while I’m disappointed that we pansied out and are sleeping inside four walls, I’m over it already. We spent most of the evening outrunning a storm and it finally caught up to us. After we left Rocky Mountain National Park (more on that later), we skipped out on stopping in Denver to try to get to Pike’s Peak before it closed. Fail. We arrived at the gates about 15 minutes before they were locked up for the night. So we doubled back to go to Garden of the Gods. Semi-fail. The clouds of the impending storm were already rolling in, so the park was rather dusky and we couldn’t really get any good pictures. We plan to go back in the …

Gypsying 101

When I tell you what I’m about to say, you’re either going to think I’m stark, raving mad or I’m going to be your hero. Personally, I think I’m a little of both. In 12 long days I will embark on a journey of epic proportions. We’re calling it a “Gypsy Trip” — we being my best friend Amanda and I — because we are going to gypsy our way across the country. Sadly, we will not be hitching up a horse and wagon, but we will be pitching a tent almost every night of the trip and camping our way through some of the most beautiful spots in the good ol’ USA. And we might even have to do some fortune telling along the way to pay for gas. I know what you’re thinking. Camping? Really?  Yes. Pitched tent, sleeping bags, s’mores and all. Our reasoning is simple: Camping is much cheaper than hotels. Sure we won’t have air conditioning. Sure, we’ll be dealing with bugs and spiders and creepy crawlies of all kinds. …